The Land of the Brave

2/3/2015

Having said that, you do not have to be a hero to live in Namibia. In fact, no courage is needed at all. Come to think of it, “we don’t need another hero”. It might be better to call it “The Land of the Patient” (as in a person who has patience rather than in need of medical treatment). You will get an idea of what I mean from a post I wrote in January entitled “Protracted tool perambulations through Sub-Sahara Africa”. Here is the link:

http://www.jenesaisquoiwoodworking.com/?p=7443

Anyway, for once I did not work in the shop this weekend. We went away with the kids as it was mid-term break. I took a few photos to give you an idea of what Namibia is all about. It is however very much an appetizer as Namibia is a vast expanse of African real estate. I tried to illustrate how the vegetation change as one travels from the Capital Windhoek to the so called Skeleton Coast.

These were taken near a town by the name of Omaruru.

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Fire and cooking on a fire is very much part of our heritage. The owners of this property reports spotting leopard tracks coming past this fire place (right next to our tent) on the way to the waterhole (maybe 100 meters away) on a regular basis. What a joy!

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This is a fairly typical road-side view. The only non-typical thing about the first picture is the sealed nature of the road. Most roads in this part of the world are unsealed.

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Here we are getting a bit closer to the coast and into the Namib Desert. With some imagination you could even see the Atlantic ocean roughly 30 km away on the horizon (2nd and 3rd picture).

 

 

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This picture show the Swakop River Mouth and Namib Desert sand dunes stretching into the freezing waters of the Benquela sea current.

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So there you have it, no woodwork, only the terroir in which I work wood.

2 thoughts on “The Land of the Brave”

  1. Wonderful pictures, thanks for sharing. I think a lot of folks in the my neck of the woods (me being one of them) have very little knowledge about the scenery and daily life in Namibia, not to mention how woodworking is different. Looking forward to more.

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